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Newfoundland Coins

NEWFOUNDLAND COINS

NEWFOUNDLAND COINS

Unlike most series of coins that people collect, Newfoundland coins are a closed set, which means they are not making them any more. Each year, we get customers stating their frustration in collecting Canadian Mint Products or Canadian quarters or even USA coins for example because they simply can’t keep up with the multitude of new issues put out every year. To complete a Newfoundland set, one need only find 140 different coins and then the challenge is completed. We have customers who have taken years to complete their Newfoundland set and are now upgrading their set as they find higher grade coins. Luckily, 90 percent of Newfoundland coins can be attained for under $10 a piece. But some rare dates will be a challenge and can be expensive. There are of course those who want only high quality coins and can spend thousands of dollars a coin on their Newfoundland collection.

We are often asked what is the rarest Newfoundland coin. It is in fact whats called a 1871 mule 10 cents, which means it has an obverse of a Newfoundland 10 cent piece and a reverse of a 1871 Canadian 10 cent. If you can find one we’ll pay you upwards of $100,000.

Remember, each year thousands of Newfoundland coins are melted for their silver content and many thousands more are sold to the lucrative tourist market through type sets (1 cent – 50 cents). The supply of Newfoundland coins is undoubtedly drying up which means as supply decreases, it is reasonable to expect prices to continue to rise. Are you up to the challenge (only major varieties listed)?

NEWFOUNDLAND COIN CHECKLIST

Scarce Coins

Scarce Coins highlighted in yellow

Very Scarce coins highlighted in green

NFLD Large and Small Cents
Newfoundland 5 Cents
Newfoundland 10 Cents
Newfoundland 20 Cents
Newfoundland 50 Cents
Newfoundland $2 Gold
O     1865
O     1865
O     1865
O     1865
O     1870
O     1865
O     1872
O     1870
O     1870
O     1870
O     1872
O     1870
O     1873
O     1872
O    1870 Dot
O     1872
O     1873
O     1870 Dot
O     1876
O     1873
O     1872
O     1873
O     1874
O     1872
O     1880
O     1873H
O     1873
O     1876
O     1876
O     1880
O     1880(oval 0)
O     1876
O     1876
O     1880
O     1880
O     1881
O     1885
O     1880
O     1880
O     1881
O     1881
O     1882
O     1888
O     1881
O     1882
O     1882
O     1882
O     1885
O     1890
O     1882
O     1885
O     1885
O     1885
O     1888
O     1894
O     1885
O     1888
O     1888
O     1888
 
O     1896
O     1888
O     1890
O     1890
O     1894
 
O     1904
O     1890
O     1894
O     1894
O     1896
 
O     1907
O     1894
O     1896
O     1896 Lg 96
O     1898
 
O     1909
O     1896
O     1903
O     1896 Sm 96
O     1899 N 9
 
O     1913
O     1903
O     1904
O     1899 Hook
O     1899 W 9
 
O     1917
O     1904
O     1912
O     1899
O     1900
 
O     1919
O     1908
O     1917
O     1900
O     1904
 
O     1920
O     1912
O     1919
O     1904
O     1907
 
O     1929
O     1917
O     1938
O     1912
O     1908
 
O     1936
O     1919
O     1940
Newfoundland 25 cents
O     1909
 
O     1938
O     1929
O     1940 RE
O     1917
O     1911
 
O     1940
O     1938
O     1941
O     1919
O     1917
 
O     1941
O     1940
O     1942
 
O     1918
 
O     1942
O     1941
O     1943
 
O     1919
 
O     1943
O     1942
O     1944
 
 
 
O     1944
O     1943
O     1945
 
 
 
O     1947
O     1944
O     1946
 
 
 
 
O     1945
 O    1947
 
 
 
 
O     1946
 
 
 
 
  O     1947        

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Why Collect Coins

WHY COLLECT COINS?

WHY COLLECT COINS?

For many years, I have had a passion in collecting, very often in explaining my passion to non-collectors, they just don’t understand. I will always be a collector at heart and it has given me many thousands of hours of enjoyment and peace. A few reasons I collect:
  • My main reason for collecting is that its my hobby, I find it fun and a great stress free way to spend some time. With the manic pace that life has some times, its a great way to temporarily get off the speeding bus we call life and just enjoy some peace and quiet in studying your craft.
  • I also collect coins and bullion as an investment, which holds true for other collectibles as well. There is something to be said for being able to hold your investment in your hands. Once you hold a bar of gold or silver in your hands, holding a quarterly RRSP statement just doesn’t compare anymore. When looking at the performance of gold and silver over time, they perform really well. I often have had people come to me and sell their gold who made more than $800 an ounce profit. To see this, we only need look back at historical prices of gold, in 1968 the average price of gold was $38.69 an ounce, in 1974 it was $159.26 an ounce, in April of 2001 it was $260 and in October 2010 it was at $1370. Collector coins are a good investment as well (although I don’t recommend mint products). When collecting coins, I always say, buy the book before the coin – in other words educate yourself first.
  • Collecting and dealing is like being a treasure hunter every day. You never know when that ultra rare item will walk in the door. We have purchased and discovered items which up to that point were unknown which is quite exciting.
  • Collecting to celebrate art. Many coins, comics, stamps etc . are fantastic pieces of art which have been created by masterful craft persons. One collector once indicated to me that his collection was indeed a miniature art collection.
  • Collecting as a way to study history and geography. Collectibles often tell a unique story. As a child I found collecting a great way to educate myself about significant historical events. The history of the world has been documented in many different types of collectible and can be quite enjoyable to the history buff. One need only hold an item that is 300 years old and wonder for a few minutes about where that item has been over that long period of time to get a sense of its history.
  • Camaraderie and fellowship are something that most collectors indicate as a great part of their hobby. Many friendships have been formed by collectors who share common interests and passions.
  • Collecting can often give one a sense of accomplishment, its a great feeling to be able to complete a collection after years of trying to find that elusive piece.
  • Significance. There is a type of prestige in collecting rare items. For instance, coin collecting which is one of the oldest hobbies was once only practiced by Kings and the wealthy. Thats why coin collecting is often called the “Hobby of Kings”
  • Hobbies can be as expensive or as inexpensive as you want. While there are those who collect items that are literally free, there are also those who only want the best. Some of these people are the one’s who paid $3,737,500 for an 1804 USA silver dollar in April of 2008, or the ones who paid, $657,000 for a Babe Ruth Jersey, or $1,075,500 for a Detective Comics, Comic book in February, 2010. Then there is of course the art market which is the highest price of all collectibles. In the History of art, many individual pieces have sold for in excess of $100 million with the top selling piece being one by American painter Jackson Pollock which fetched over $140 million!!! On the other side, coins which you might think very valuable can be attained very cheaply for instance a copper coin from the Ming Dynasty can be easily purchased for $20 depending on its condition.
  • Finally, collecting is a nice way to leave a legacy to your children and family. Many people collect items so they can pass them on to their children so they can be a family treasure for years to come. They see it as a way of preserving their heritage. With the high prices of silver and gold many collectible items are being melted for the bullion value never to be seen again.

What are coins worth

WHAT ARE YOUR COINS WORTH?

WHAT ARE YOUR COINS WORTH?

The prices quoted here should be used as a rough guide. As silver and gold prices change, the listed prices here may also change dramatically
Each year we get thousands of inquiries from people asking how much their coins are worth. This is not a simple question to answer however 90% of the purchases we make are fairly simple for a non-collector to figure out. Firstly, there are three main factors that affect a coin’s value :
  • Age
  • Scarcity
  • Condition

The most important factor is condition and age is the least important. For example in regards to age, we would pay you $10 for a 1991 Canada quarter yet we could sell an 1870 Canada Quarter for $5. In most cases the condition of the coin is the most important factor and in most cases we would have to see the coin to determine the condition or grade. If for instance you were going to buy an old car and it is dated 1955, the value would vary greatly if the car is not running and rusted versus a car which is in mint condition.

The same logic works in the collectibles market with some exceptions (some used stamps are worth much more than mint ones). The problem we most often encounter is that when people do their own research they look to sites like ebay and find a coin the same year as theirs and automatically assume their coin is of the same value. Coin condition is determined by a numerical grading scale which goes from 0 – 70. The most common grades are as follows: G-4 (well worn), VG-8, F-12, VF-20, EF-40 (some wear), AU-50, MS60 (Mint State), MS63, MS-64, MS-65. Any coins with a grade MS60 or higher are Mint State or have no wear whatsoever on them. The problem occurs when people go to the internet and see a coin of the same year as theirs in MS65 which is in pristine mint condition and they assume their coin which might be G-4 condition is worth the same price.

The only true way to find out the value of your collectibles is to try to sell them. There are hundreds of different price guides many of which are offered at better book stores. We carry them as well. Although an item is assigned a book value, that does not necessarily mean you will get that price. We have also seen instances where items sell far beyond their book value. If you are unsure of value and want a free quote, drop us a line with a picture of the item if possible.

WHAT’S THE VALUE OF YOUR COINS?

Many coins in the Canadian and Newfoundland series are very common and only worth their silver value. There are many hundreds that we could list and as mentioned the higher the grade or condition (especially on early issues) the higher the price. Of course, as silver and gold prices change so will the value of your coins which are related to the bullion value.

We really need to see your coins to give you a fair appraisal or offer but without being able to do that we can offer you some general guidelines based on what we see most often.

If you are buying coins – especially scarce ones, be sure to get the contact information of the person you are buying from and some ID as the market has been flooded with counterfeit coins from China in recent years and they are very good quality, In most cases, it would take an expert to tell the fakes from the real thing.

Remember, these are base prices of what we are paying. Higher grade coins could command much higher prices:
  • Common Newfoundland half dollars: $7.50 each and up each
  • Common Newfoundland 20 and 25 cents: $3.75 each and up
  • Common Newfoundland 10 cents : $1.50 each and up
  • Common Newfoundland 5 cents: 75 cents each and up
  • Common Newfoundland Large cents: $1.00 each and up
  • Common Newfoundland small cents: 10 cents each and up
  • Newfoundland $2 gold : $250.00 each and up

Coin Examples

Example 1
  • coin-value-examples-1

  • coin-value-examples-2

To the above left is a Canada 50 cent piece made of nickel (worth face value). To the right is a Canada Silver 50 cent piece (1967 and earlier) worth at least $5 each. Note. The nickel half dollars will stick to a magnet.

Example 2
  • coin-value-examples-3

  • coin-value-examples-4

The above left shows a mint condition (MS64) George V 50 cent coin and the above right shows a coin of the same year in well worn condition (VG8).

Example 3
  • coin-value-examples-5

  • coin-value-examples-6

Even though the Edward VII coin on the above left looks to be in mint condition to the untrained eye, its actually almost uncirculated (AU). The coin on the above right is much more worn and in VG condition.
Scarcer Newfoundland coins:
  • 1 CENT:

    • 1885 and 1888 – $20 each and up

    • 1880 Oval O – $75 each and up

  • 5 CENT:

    • All before 1888 are scarce

    • 1885: $100 each and up

    • 1876 : $75 each and up

    • 1873: $200 and up

    • 1873H: $650 and up

    • 1946: $800 and up

  • 10 CENT:

      1870: $100 each and up

  • 20 CENT:

    • All are common – value depends largely on the grade and need to be priced individually

  • 50 CENT:

    • All from 1904 – 1919 are common – this series depends largely on the grade or condition.


  • Canadian Coins:

    COMMON CANADIAN SILVER (1966 AND BACK):

    • 5 cent silver

      75 cents
    • 10 cent silver

      $1.50 each
    • 25 cent silver

      $3.75 each
    • 50 cent silver

      $7.50 each
    • Silver Dollars

      $15 each
    These prices are subject to change based on the price of silver.

    COMMON CANADIAN SILVER (1967):

    • 10 cent silver

      $1.10 cents
    • 25 cent silver

      $2.75 each
    • 50 cent silver

      $7.50 each
    • Silver Dollars

      $15.00 each

    COMMON CANADIAN SILVER (1967):

    • 10 cent silver

      80 cents
    • 25 cent silver

      $2.00 each
    Midway through 1968 Canada stopped using silver in its coinage. If your coins stick to a magnet they are not silver and are of no value to us.

    Scarce Canadian Coins:

    • SILVER DOLLARS

      • 1948: $850 and up

      • 1947 (any type): $80 and up

      • 1946: $30 and up

      • 1945: $100 and up

      • 1938: $30 and up

    • 50 CENTS

      • 1948: $75 and up

      • 1932: $125 and up

      • 1921: very rare – beware of counterfeits – please call

      • 1905, 1904 – $100 and up

      • 1901 and earlier: $25 – $850 in low grade to $10,000 + in high grade

    • 25 CENT:

      • 1927: $10 and up

      • 1915: $10 and up

      • 1893, 1889, 1887, 1885, 1880,1875: all $50 and up if in problem free collectible condition

    • 10 CENT:

      • 1969 with a large date: $7000 and up

      • 1889: $200 and up

      • 1884: $50 and up/div>

      • 1875: $100 and up/div>

    • 5 CENT:

      • 1925: $50 and up

      • 1921: $2000 and up

      • 1884, 1875: $50 and up

    • CENT:

      • 1922, 1923, 1925: $10 each and up

      • 1858: $30 and up

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